Oceanaire’s Ivory King Salmon with Chantrelle Mushrooms

Serves 4

– 4 pieces ivory king salmon steaks (request center cut, 8 to 10 ounces each)
– ½ pound chanterelle mushrooms, sliced (substitute porcini if chanterelles are not available)
– 4 ounces extra virgin olive oil, divided
– 6 ounces white wine
– 16 ounces unsalted organic chicken stock
– ½ tablespoon fresh thyme leaves, chopped
– 2 tablespoons minced shallots
– 1 tablespoon minced garlic
– 3 tablespoons whole butter, divided
– 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
– Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
– Lemon wedges and parsley sprigs to garnish

1. Preheat grill to medium-low heat. Brush salmon filets with 1 ounce olive oil and season well with kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper. Grill fish to preferred doneness depending on thickness of filets.

2. Meanwhile, preheat large, heavy sauté pan over high heat and add the remaining 3 ounces of olive oil to pan and allow to heat. When oil is very hot, carefully add the mushrooms and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Sauté without agitating the pan until one side begins to caramelize, approximately 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat. Carefully turn the mushrooms onto the second side and season with more salt and pepper. When slightly brown on the second side, empty the mushrooms into a strainer with a pan underneath to catch the extra oil.

3. Return the sauté pan to the heat and add 1 tablespoon of butter to the pan. Add shallots and garlic and render until blonde. Add thyme. Remove from heat and deglaze with white wine. Return to heat and reduce liquid by half. When reduced, add chicken stock and reduce to sauce consistency.

 

4. Return mushrooms to pan and add the remainder of the whole butter. Gently swirl the pan until butter is completely melted. Adjust seasonings with salt and pepper, and finish with lemon juice. Remove the salmon from the grill and place on a large serving platter. Top the salmon filets with the chanterelle mushroom mixture, garnish with lemons and parsley and serve.

*Taken from a 2004 Seattle Time’s article on White King Salmon